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Joinery Handplanes with Bill Anderson

Joinery Handplanes
with Bill Anderson

$29.99

Learn how to identify, use, and repair wooden and metal joinery planes in this five hour instructional video that's...[Read More]
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A Cabinetmaker's Notebook

A CabMaker's Notebook

$21.95

A well known work by Krenov, this is the first in a series of four books written about the art and craft of cabinetmaking....[Read More]
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Patented Brace Bits with Threaded Tang by James E. Price

Inventors in the 19th Century sought patents for improvements to tools to make them perform better and sometimes, with more precision. Such is the case of G. L. Holt of Springfield, Mass. who on June 29, 1875 was granted U.S. Patent No. 164,999 for a more precision way to hold bits in a brace.  The Barber Shell Chuck, patented a decade earlier, had seized a big part of the market and was quickly making button and lever chucks obsolete.

   

Boxwood Low-angle Smoother by Adrian Britt

This Boxwood Low-angle Smoother with a bronze sole and snecked iron was inspired by a plane made by maker Olie Sparks. First things first, I need to acknowledge the pioneering and game-changing work put into this plane design by Ollie Sparks. His work in making a contemporary version of the plane provided me both inspiration and a firm resolve to attempt this myself. While there are subtle changes in my plane, I tried ...

 
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Unique Carved Plane by Ryan Sparreboom

As a rhykenologist (woodworking plane collector), I often seek unusual planes to add to my collection. Elaborately carved or decorated planes are at the top of my list of desirable pieces. Most often originating from Dutch and a few other Central European regions, these planes can be difficult to find and fetch high prices. When I had the chance to buy this little plane several years ago, I had to grab it.

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I call this the “Jimi-Jack” by Adrian Britt

I’ve been admiring (more like copious drooling) the Boxwood /Gabon Ebony Jack plane of Jim Hendricks for the better part of last year. It is such a beautiful plane. Inspired by that project, I thought now is the time to proceed. I didn’t have any large Ebony, so I’m using some lovely Katalox for the wedge, strike button, and handle. A solid plus is that Katalox is super tough and has interlocked fibers.

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Hand Vise/Bitstock Tool by James E. Price

In my post on handles/holders I purposefully did not mention a very interesting and useful type that at first glance appears to be a hand vise. But it is also a bitstock tool that came with a set of tools, including a washer cutter, in a compartment in its handle. It was made by Miller's Falls and appeared to be popular in the 1920's. It was referred to as "No. 1 Alford's Hand Vise" ...

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Record 311 3-in-1 Shoulder Plane by James E. Price

A tool buddy of mine recently sold me a never-used Record 311 3-in-1 shoulder plane and today I made a simple case for it and tried out its various functions. In my opinion it has four functions. It can be used as a shoulder plane, a rabbet plane, a bullnose rabbet plane, and a chisel plane.

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Mathieson in March - Part 4 by Ryan Sparreboom

This week, in the final installment of “Mathieson in March,” we will look at a few planes made by the Mathieson firm. I will also discuss some of the Mathieson maker marks, and the approximate period during which these marks appeared.

Over the past several weeks, I have introduced and discussed a great deal of the history of the Mathieson Company.

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Restoring Post-war Norris A5 Plane by Adrian Britt

I like Norris planes and have several of them. Post-war A5s have features that distinguish them from pre-war A5s. Some of the features are cosmetic, and some are fundamental changes in construction. In pre-war models, the sides of the body were dovetailed together using steel plates. In contrast, the sides of the post-war models are welded to the bottom. Welding is a major change in construction.

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Scoring the Big One by James E. Price

If you haunt auctions, antique stores, flea markets, and yard sales long enough you will finally score the big one. I did that in 1989 at an open-air flea market in an abandoned drive-in theater at Pevely, Missouri. I had found very little at the market and a picker I knew showed up and took me to his truck to show me a plane he thought I might want. He reached into a box of junk and pulled...

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Mathieson in March - Part 3 by Ryan Sparreboom

Last week, I introduced some of the early history of Alexander Mathieson through his relationship with late 18th and early 19th-century plane-maker John Manners. Mathieson’s company expanded slowly in the first half of the 19th century. The Scottish census of 1841 listed Alex Mathieson as a “master plane-maker.” By 1851, census records show that he had eight employees, one of whom was his son ...

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Embellished Axe by James E. Price

This axe could have remained plain like most axes but the maker wished to embellish it with his artistic touch. The decorations are deep and must have been punched while the iron was red hot. It has an applied steel cutting edge which measures six inches from front to back. It is a hewing axe and is decorated on only one side. This fine piece of art in the form of an axe originated in Bulgaria.

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Mathieson in March - Part 2 by Ryan Sparreboom

Last week, I introduced some of the early history of Alexander Mathieson through his relationship with late 18th and early 19th-century plane-maker John Manners.

Mathieson’s company expanded slowly in the first half of the 19th century. The Scottish census of 1841 listed Alex Mathieson as a “master plane-maker.” By 1851, census records show that he had eight employees, one of whom was his son ...

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L-N No. 62 Low Angle Jack vs. 10” Robert Towell Miter by Adrian Britt

In truth, this is maybe an apples and oranges comparison. However, I find myself grabbing for each at different times or applications. Anyone who owns a L-N No. 62 can attest to its precision and versatility. It is clear. I find my 62 works best in several instances. First, it’s a fantastic jointer on small projects. I can even clamp it upside down ...

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Recent Articles


 

Latest Updates and Additions


Mathieson in March - Part 1 by Ryan Sparreboom

Old Hammers by James E. Price

Preston 1354 Smoothing Plane by Ryan Sparreboom

Thomas Phillipson, 1740-1760 by Jim Hendricks

Backyard Walnut Grove by James E. Price

Preston Patented 2500P Router Plane by Ryan Sparreboom

Small Bearded Hatchet by James E. Price

The Dutch Gerfschaaf by Ryan Sparreboom

Through Thick and Thin by Jim Hendricks

Drawknife with Cow Horn Handles by James E. Price

My Favorite Infill Plane by Ryan Sparreboom

What is a... Sporris? by Adrian Britt

Madox, Tracy, and Bown Connection by Jim Hendricks

“Diamond Edge" Miter Boxes - Hardware Dealers' Magazine, Vol.39

Corner Braces - Directory of Patents

1893 - Amidon's Corner Brace - Electrical Review, Vol. 32

1881 - Disston's "Star Saw Set" - The Builder and WoodWorker, Vol. 17.

1902 - The Chapin-Stephens Co. New Catalog - Iron Age and Carpentry and Building

Henry Stanley - Stanley Rule & Level Co.

Latest Downloads


1956 - Buck Bros. Fine Hand Tools Catalog

1962 - You and Your Job with Simonds Saw and Steel Co.

1920 - Handbook for Drillers - The Cleveland Twist Drill Co.

1959 - Marples "Shamrock Brand" Catalog

1904 - The Simonds Saws & Knives catalog - Simonds Mfg. Co.

 

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